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🤖 GPT

Turbo Fact Checker Myth Debunker

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This Chat GPT-powered prompt is designed to help people fact-check information quickly and easily. It uses advanced natural language processing technology to analyze information and provide a clear and concise report on the accuracy of claims, complete with citations and references to authoritative sources. This prompt is an essential resource for journalists, students, and concerned citizens seeking accurate and reliable information.
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1 year ago

Prompt Details

Model
Chat - GPT-3.5 (gpt-3.5-turbo)
Token size
316 ($0.00060 / call)
Example input
[your claim]: People only use 10% of their brain capacity. The Great Wall of China is visible from space. The seasons are caused by the Earth's distance from the Sun. Goldfish have a memory span of only a few seconds. Bulls get angry when they see the color red.
Example output
TEST OUTPUT NO. 1: Claim 1: False Explanation: The claim that people only use 10% of their brain capacity is false. This is a popular myth that has been debunked by numerous studies and experts in neuroscience. MRI scans have shown that even during simple tasks, such as watching television or daydreaming, the brain is using a significant portion of its capacity. In fact, the brain is constantly rewiring itself and forming new connections, which is evidence of its continual activity. While it is true that some areas of the brain may be more active than others during certain tasks, this does not mean that the rest of the brain is unused. Claim 2: False Explanation: The claim that the Great Wall of China is visible from space is false. While the Great Wall of China is an impressive structure, it is not visible from space with the naked eye. Astronauts have reported that it is difficult to see any man-made structures from space without the aid of binoculars or a telescope. Even when viewed from low Earth orbit, the Great Wall of China appears as a thin line that is difficult to distinguish from its surrounding terrain. Therefore, the claim that the Great Wall of China is visible from space is a popular myth that is not supported by scientific evidence. Claim 3: False Explanation: The claim that the seasons are caused by the Earth's distance from the Sun is false. The Earth's distance from the Sun does vary slightly throughout the year, but this is not the primary cause of the seasons. The main cause of the seasons is the tilt of the Earth's axis, which causes different parts of the Earth to receive different amounts of sunlight throughout the year. When the Northern Hemisphere is tilted towards the Sun, it receives more direct sunlight and experiences summer, while the Southern Hemisphere is tilted away from the Sun and experiences winter. When the Northern Hemisphere is tilted away from the Sun, it receives less direct sunlight and experiences winter, while the Southern Hemisphere is tilted towards the Sun and experiences summer. Therefore, the claim that the seasons are caused by the Earth's distance from the Sun is not accurate. Claim 4: False Explanation: The claim that goldfish have a memory span of only a few seconds is false. While goldfish may not have the same type of memory as humans, they are capable of remembering things for much longer than a few seconds. Studies have shown that goldfish are able to learn and remember tasks, such as navigating mazes or recognizing colors. They are also able to recognize their owners and respond to training. Therefore, the claim that goldfish have a memory span of only a few seconds is a popular myth that is not supported by scientific evidence. Claim 5: False Explanation: The claim that bulls get angry when they see the color red is false. While it is true that bullfighters traditionally use a red cape, bulls are actually colorblind and cannot distinguish between red and other colors. Bulls are actually provoked by the movement of the cape, not the color. In fact, bullfighters have used capes of different colors, such as yellow or pink, with similar results. Therefore, the claim that bulls get angry when they see the color red is a popular myth that is not supported by scientific evidence. TEST OUTPUT NO. 2: Of course, you can also enter longer, coherent text, such as: He was watching the Great Wall of China from space, using only 10% of his brain. In this case you will also get a fact-checked answer: True or false: False. Explanation: The claim that someone watched the Great Wall of China from space using only 10% of their brain is false. This claim is a common myth that has been debunked by science. Firstly, the idea that humans only use 10% of their brain is a misconception. Modern brain imaging techniques have shown that humans use most of their brain, even when engaged in simple tasks. The myth likely stems from a misinterpretation of early 20th-century research on brain activity, which suggested that only a small portion of the brain is active at any given time. Secondly, even if it were true that humans only use 10% of their brain, this would not enable someone to watch the Great Wall of China from space. Space is an inhospitable environment that poses numerous challenges for human survival. It is unlikely that someone could survive in space without the use of their full brain capacity. Furthermore, the Great Wall of China is not visible from space with the naked eye. This is another common misconception that has been debunked by astronauts who have actually been in space. While the Great Wall is an impressive feat of engineering, it is not visible from low Earth orbit without the aid of magnifying instruments such as binoculars or a camera lens. In conclusion, the claim that someone watched the Great Wall of China from space using only 10% of their brain is false. This claim is based on a misunderstanding of the human brain and a misinterpretation of the visibility of the Great Wall from space. It is important to fact-check such claims to ensure that accurate information is being conveyed to the public.
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